Sunday, September 18, 2011

The Hohokam


The Hohokam people existed as far back as 200 B.C. until around 1450 in the south-central area of the Arizona. The name Hohokam derives from the word Hoohoogum, a moniker given to those living in that region of the southwest desert. History tells us that this tribe migrated north from Mexico and settled in southern Arizona. From the Hohokam ruins we can see they were a skilled group of farmers who built elaborate canals that went on for miles. They grew corn, beans, squash, agave, and cotton for clothing and other uses to protect themselves from the harsh environment. The Hohokam were hunters and feasted on deer, rabbit, quail, and various types of fish. They used their stone tools for cooking and building while living in their mud houses created from the desert’s materials.


Not much was know about this tribe nor written about their demise. We are able to study them through the well engineered canals, ruins, and written stories on rocks known as petroglyhps that were left behind.

There are several stories on what happened to the Hohokam. One is they simply went back to Mexico due to the drought in Arizona, while another theory is they stayed and split up into different tribes. It is not entirely clear what happen, perhaps their story is buried in the ruins somewhere in the southwest desert.


9 comments:

  1. Thank you for sharing this info. I love learning about long lost civilizations. I like the mystery of not knowing what happened to them. They are now lost in the mists of time.

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  2. Fascinating post. Thanks for sharing. :)))

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  3. We need to get back there and document more of those tons and tons of glyphs. They are fascinating and when you stand there and look out over the are, you can imagine what they saw and what they drew about.

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  4. This is really cool information. I love learning about stuff like this. Now, on a lighter note... hoohoogum? Were the people that gave this moniker hillbillies? I think I know a family with 10 teeth among them living in a trailer park that have a dog named Hoohoogum.

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  5. Interesting. It sounds like archeologists need to do more research on this tribe.

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  6. I love the art they left on those rocks!

    Oh and this is unrelated, but last weekend I got to catch a little cable in a hotel and saw Ghost Adventures. It happened to be the episode where they're at Vulture Mine and I thought of you guys! That goofy Aaron was cracking me up with the faces he made. I loved the moment where he heard the sound of a piano key.

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  7. Thanks everyone for your great comments. I found the Hohokam to be an interesting group of people. I would love to learn more about them. Yes Justine, Vulture Mine was one of my favorite abandoned places. I am hoping we can do a ghost hunt there someday.

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  8. Beautiful photos, I find the glyphs intriquing. I'd be interested to hear more about them, as well!

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  9. Hi Adsila! It's always great to see people who are excited to learn about the Hohokam culture and their legacy here throughout Arizona. If you're interested in learning more about the Hohokam and what may have happened to them, I encourage you and your fellow followers to check out Pueblo Grande Museum, Casa Grande and Mesa Grande to see Hohokam ruins that are from 500 to over 1000 years old. :) Thanks for helping to keep the Hohokam legacy alive by continuing to share their story.

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